How to Make a Thing in Haskell, Part 3: Buildin' with Tests, Cookin' with Gas

Of course, we can’t Build Real Software without a good testing rig. In this post, I’ll talk about using Hspec, which Haskeleton uses by default, and I like it a lot so far.

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How to Make a Thing in Haskell, Part 2: Hello, Cabal!

Up until now, my use of Haskell’s tooling has been very simple. I use ghci to run interactively, and I run source files with runhaskell. This makes my Haskell toolbelt comfortably similar to my Python toolbelt – I have an interactive interpreter, and a command I can use to run a source file. I hardly ever have a reason to compile binaries with ghc, since I haven’t built anything nontrival with Haskell.

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How to Make a Thing in Haskell, Part 1: Motivation

Haskell is, allegedly, one of those languages that bends your mind a lot, but you never write Real Programs in. Well, I’m going to build my first Real Live Program in Haskell. I’ve picked a nontrivial but reasonably-scoped tool I want to build, and I thought I’d write about building it as I go, just to solidify my knowledge of the tools and concepts I need. So, this is the first of a series of posts where I’ll document the process of learning to do a Haskell for real. In this post, I’ll motivate my project, talking about why I’m using Haskell and about the tool I’m cloning. In future posts, I’ll set up cabal to build and test my program, and then actually build and test the thing!

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Heaven Knows

Today, a bunch of Twitter’s most active and (IMO) best bot makers got together at Bot Summit, organized by Darius Kazemi to talk about, well, bots.

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Searching formulae…

Ok, developers who use OS X: you use Homebrew, right? When was the last time you ran brew update? Was it before today? Today, as in October 28th? Cool. Could you try something for me? Run brew install racket. (Don’t worry, nothing bad will happen. It won’t even install Racket.)

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